Demi describes her personal rock bottom in a new interview.

By Hayden Wright

Demi Lovato has been an open book about her struggles with body image, addiction and mental illness in her music, on social media and in interviews. On the eve of her sixth studio album Tell Me You Love Me, the singer sat down with NPR to discuss the themes and influences that inspired the record.

Lovato, who celebrated five years of sobriety in March, described the lowest point of her drinking.

Related: Demi Lovato to Discuss Sexuality in New Documentary

“Rock bottom hit me in a moment when I was drinking vodka out of a Sprite bottle at nine in the morning on my way to the airport,” she said. “I actually threw up in the back of the car service, and I had a moment where I thought to myself, ‘Wow, this is no longer glamorous. This is no longer a young person having fun with drinking and alcohol and experimentation. This is actually pathetic and sad.'”

While in treatment, Demi was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Rather than keeping these personal challenges to herself, the singer decided to face them openly in the public eye.

“There are many, many mental illnesses that people struggle with on a day-to-day basis, and nobody feels comfortable enough to talk about it and to get the help that they need,” she said. “We could prevent … so many lives [being] destroyed by mental illness if we just talk about it and we take the stigma away from it.”

On her new album Tell Me You Love Me, Demi says the best way to move on from the shame and stigma of addiction is to own her experience inside and out.

“I was thinking about the bullies that bullied me in school, and how well I’m doing in my life today, and how I don’t give a flying f— about it. I’ve spent so many years apologizing for my behavior and for the person that I used to be, so now I no longer am apologizing for who I was.”

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